September 18, 2018No Comments

A Guide to HAZMAT Trucking Responsibilities

A Guide to HAZMAT Trucking Responsibilities

HAZMAT trucking is defined as the transportation of radioactive, flammable, explosive or even poisonous materials. However, did you know these items are hidden in plain sight? From designer paint brands to batteries and household cleaners, their journey from the manufacturer to the end consumer was anything but simple.  Read more

September 12, 20182 Comments

6 HAZMAT Securement Strategies for Freight Carriers

6 HAZMAT Securement Strategies for Freight Carriers

It’s crucial that HAZMAT drivers are taking the necessary precautions to transport freight safely. Everything carried in transit must be properly secured not only to prevent falling cargo but to also ensure the safety of the driver and load. Read more

September 12, 2018No Comments

How to Become a Hazmat Certified Truck Driver

How to Become a Hazmat Certified Truck Driver

Whether you’re taking a leap into trucking or simply exploring what it takes to become a HAZMAT certified truck driver, it’s important to educate yourself on the components involved in the certification process. Read more

August 31, 2018No Comments

The Top 5 Best Safety Practices for HAZMAT Carriers

The Top 5 Best Safety Practices for HAZMAT Carriers

From batteries and antifreeze to paint and cleaning agents, various materials fall under the category of hazardous materials. More specifically, DOT defines a hazardous material as any item or chemical, when being transported in commerce, that’s a risk to public safety or the environment. Read more

August 29, 20184 Comments

AOBRD vs. ELD

AOBRD vs. ELD: What's the Difference?

An automatic onboarding recording device is a piece of hardware that connects to the vehicle's engine to record driver's hours-of-service (HOS). It functions much like an electronic logging device (ELD) except it records and displays less data. Similar to AOBRD, an ELD is a piece of hardware that connects to the vehicle's ECM to accurately record the driver's HOS.

However, AOBRD vs. ELD differs regarding how much data they record and how much you can edit. The chart below summarizes the FMCSA's comparison chart.

                AOBRD                   ELD
What it Recorded
  •   Date and Time
  •   Engine Hours
  •   Vehicle Miles
  •   Drive Times
  •   Locations
  •   Duty Status
  •  Date and Time
  •  Engine Hours
  •  Vehicle Miles
  •  Locations
  •  Information on the driver, motor carrier, vehicle, duty status, logging in and out, engine on and off, malfunctions
Locations
  •  Recorded during each change of duty status
  •  Can be entered manually
Automatically recorded when:

  • Change on duty status
  •  60 minutes interval while driving
  •  When the engine is turned off and on
  •  At the start and end of yard moves and personal conveyance
Edit History
  • Records who made an edit and when
  • Does not readily display edit history
  •  Records who made an edit and when
  •   All edits require annotation
  •  Automatically recorded events cannot be changed – only annotated
  •  Readily displays edit history to DOT inspectors
Driving Time
  •  Driving time can only be edited when attributed to the wrong driver
  •  Driving time cannot be edited

ELDs Are More Restrictive Than AOBRDs

The rules surrounding ELDs are specific on how the device must handle particular events and situations. ELDs automatically switch the driver's duty status to "On-Duty, Not driving, whenever their vehicle has stopped moving for five consecutive minutes, and the driver has not responded to the prompt within 60 seconds. In contrast, AOBRDs are not changing the driver's duty status when the vehicle is no longer in motion.

In addition, ELDs have to warn drivers about any unassigned driving time and miles that the device records when they log into the ELD. Electronic logging devices require that all vehicle miles are accounted for (even if a mechanic takes the vehicle for a test drive) to ensure driver logs are accurate. As a result, ELDs are far more restrictive than AOBRDs.

FMCSA will allow the use of AOBRDs until December 16, 2019, on the condition that the truck had AOBRD since before the mandate; that is, before December 18, 2017. Any new vehicles that are purchased and put into service after December 18, 2017, require ELD and not AOBRD.

July 10, 2018No Comments

Quarterly Bonuses for Our Drivers

Driving a truck is a challenging job. Many drivers feel that they are not paid what they are worth considering the amount of work that they put it on a daily basis. Insufficient pay is a significant reason why many truck drivers leave their companies or abandon the industry entirely. This has been a source of frustration for many carriers, shippers, and customers, as the lack of truck drivers has led to capacity shortages, significant delays in transportation, and increased rates across the country. These problems could all be alleviated if more drivers were earning what they believe they deserve, and there are things that carriers can do to help attract more drivers to their fleet.

At the end of the article, you can see our drivers that reached the milestones for their bonuses for Q2 of 2018

Bonuses

 

While many carriers claim that they cannot raise wages or the rates that they pay their drivers, they can indeed offer attainable and tangible bonuses that can significantly increase the pay of the truckers. If a driver performs exceptionally, he is bringing in more money to the company, and he should be treated as such. A driver should be rewarded for his dedication and his contribution to the increased profits of the carrier.

 

Unfortunately, many carriers don’t offer bonuses at all, or they offer packages that are unattainable or just not worth the extra effort. Driver bonuses should be based on clear guidelines and achievements, setting realistic expectations and giving the drivers a fair share of what they earned. If a driver has to push himself exceptionally hard for a small one-time bonus, he will become burnt out and may lose motivation to strive towards the bonus.

 

Our company, however, looks at bonuses in a different way than most other carriers. Last quarter, we came up with a new program. It has been well received by our drivers and has resulted in big payouts for them. Our drivers start with a base salary of 50 cents. With our new bonus structure, we promised our hard-working drivers that they could make 60 cents per mile. However, they went over 33,000 miles. This is a retroactive bonus that includes all the miles they already drove plus any additional miles after the 33k. This means that if a driver hit 34,000 miles, he gets 60 cents per mile on all those miles, or an additional 10 cents, which comes out to $3400 for the quarter. That is undoubtedly a significant bonus!

 

We have a large fleet of drivers, and many of them hit this milestone, so we are paying over $50,000 in bonuses for the last quarter. We are happy to keep our promise because it means that our drivers are making more money and will be happier in the long run. This will help us retain a strong employee base and create a culture that focuses on teamwork and success.

 

We have found that this is a far more effective strategy than that employed by many other carriers. They often promise only certain benefits as a reward for working more extended hours and spending more time away from their family. This is not enough incentive for a driver to continue working harder, and we believe it is why many truckers leave their carriers. While many people enjoy the lifestyle of a truck driver, money speaks volumes, and they will pursue opportunities where they can make more money if they feel like they are being underpaid.

 

Truck Driver Bonus

Signing Bonuses

 

Some carriers offer signing bonuses to entice new drivers to begin working with them. These signing bonuses, however, are often spread out over the first year or two of driving, and usually only amount to around $3,000. With our new bonus program, our drivers can earn this or more in every quarter. This is a far more attractive option for drivers who are willing to put in the hours to make the miles happen.

 

A signing bonus is nice, but as we mentioned, it is a small, one-time bonus that you may not even see to completion if you don’t stay with the company or if they go under. Continual, goal-based bonuses are a superior reward system that will help motivate drivers to reach new goals and heights in their careers continually. If a driver can earn an extra $12,000 or more throughout the year, he will want to work for the company and continue to strive for excellence.

 

Driver Retention

 

We believe that our company benefits from keeping a loyal, dedicated fleet of drivers rather than cycling through a large group of temporary drivers and suffering from high turnover. It is our strategy to provide a proper and profitable atmosphere for every one of our drivers, and that starts with paying them what we believe that they deserve. A well-paid driver is a happy driver that is far less likely to pursue a position at another company.

 

We make this possible by offering a very fair base pay but also giving the incentive to reach milestones to procure large, sustainable bonuses. As mentioned, we had many drivers reached their milestones last quarter, and we are proudly paying them the extra money that we promised. This is because we value every one of our employees and we know that each of these drivers worked hard every single day to drive the number of miles needed to earn these bonuses.

 

Hard work always pays off in the long run, and it is up to carriers to reward their drivers in a fair and lucrative manner. A driver bonus should feel like a significant amount of money that can significantly raise their annual income rather than the small perks and benefits that many carriers offer. Drivers who are not fairly compensated will ultimately end up looking elsewhere for their income. Many even look for new careers entirely, and that is harmful to the industry as a whole. It is up to us as carriers to provide fair wages, healthy bonuses, and profitable life for our truck drivers.

Q2 2018 Logiflex Drivers that got their bonus

Edgard Alvarez - 41022 miles

Roscoe Battle - 35549 miles

Robert Belcher - 38048 miles

Gilberto Enriquez - 35358 miles

Larry Ford - 39375 miles

Fabian Garcia - 34553 miles

Richard Marschall - 42167 miles

Alan Meyer - 34679 miles

Hristo Mihaylov - 44937 miles

Hristo Moysev - 34030 miles

Gloria Null - 34930 miles

Adrian Padilla - 33668 miles

Vladimir Petkov - 39372 miles

Robert Pinkelton - 38972 miles

Elmer Rodriguez - 33484 miles

Lorenzo Steer - 33730 miles

Randy Trichel - 36947 miles

Christopher Valenzuela - 36543 miles

Robert Wess - 37327 miles

Tim Wagner - 33252 miles (Tim joined Logiflex in May, but still made the bonus in just two months!)

 

If you want to join our team send us an email to info@logiflexinc.com or Join Logiflex's Driver Team

July 6, 2018No Comments

How the ELD Mandate Helps Drivers

 

The ELD mandate has been a controversial subject among truckers, shippers, and manufacturers alike. Many drivers have complained that it places unfair restrictions on them and results in lost revenue, rendering their job less lucrative than it was in the past. Shippers and manufacturers have fought against the mandate because it increases their transport time, forcing them to put more work into supply chain planning. These are all valid concerns, but many people believe that the ELD mandate is a blessing in disguise, bringing higher levels of safety and fairness into the industry, making it more profitable for everyone involved. Some of the benefits of the mandate are highlighted below.

 

Reduced Abuse of Paper Logs

 

It is no secret that paper logs have been abused in the industry for years. Paper logs are easily manipulated, allowing the driver to work far beyond his legal limits by making a few simple tweaks in the logbook. This practice hasn’t been limited only to rogue truck drivers looking to get more money out of more miles. Dispatchers, shippers, and customers have played a significant part in abusing the system as well.

 

Before the ELD mandate was put into place, it was common practice for many shippers to expect team service out of solo drivers. They wouldn’t explicitly tell drivers to manipulate their logs, but the implication was clear that the carrier would only win the shipment if they were willing to run illegally. Despite how many honorable carriers would reject the load due to being unable to meet the requirements, shippers knew that there was always going to be a driver that would accept the task.

 

This was harmful to the industry in several ways. First, it set a precedent for these abusive shippers that they could get away with promoting illegal runs while not suffering the consequences. The only party that would be held responsible would be the truck driver. This then made expectations across the industry unrealistic, and even worse, extremely unsafe. A single driver running cross-country in two days with little to no sleep is a hazard to anyone in his path. Not only is he more likely to be involved in an accident, but he is also harming his health by overloading his body.

 

Drivers that were taking these kinds of shipments were doing a disservice to the honest, hard-working drivers across the country. They were undercutting reliable companies to make a quick buck. Thanks to the ELD mandate, shippers have more realistic expectations and can’t as easily skirt the law by hiring drivers who will run illegally.

 

Increased Safety & Health

 

No matter which way you look at it, it is not safe for any driver to be on the road if he is sick, tired, or overworked. While there is room for debate over just how many hours a driver can work before he should be required to shut down, it is commonly accepted that there needs to be some regulation on continuous hours driven. The ELD mandate helps to make the roads safer for the drivers and everyone else in their vicinity.

 

It isn’t fair for shippers to hold drivers to more demanding standards than warehouse workers, factory hands, or office employees. A long day of driving can be stressful and exhausting, taking a significant physical toll on the driver’s body. In the past, drivers were often told by dispatchers to keep moving past their legal hours to meet a deadline. This was not only illegal but extremely dangerous. No load is worth risking life and driving while sick or tired is a hazard that puts everyone’s well-being on the line.

 

If a driver continues to burn himself out by driving too many hours, he is putting his overall health at risk as well. Every person needs to get the right amount of sleep to function healthily regularly. Continually running overtime and neglecting rest periods has been proven to be detrimental to your health, so it’s essential for a driver to pay attention to these. By shutting down for the required hours, a driver is helping both himself and his company by staying healthy. The ELD mandate helps with this and may even curb the illegal use of amphetamines that many drivers abused to stay awake.

 

Higher Pay

 

One of the most common complaints about the ELD mandate is that it hinders the driver’s ability to make money. Many drivers claim that because they can’t drive as far in a short amount of time, they are missing out on the loads that provide them with the money they need to survive. In the time it took to haul a single load, they say, they used to be able to knock out two or three.

 

This is an understandable concern, and the new structure may take some getting used to. However, the ELD mandate offers plenty of opportunities to make more money while working fewer hours. Because of the mandate, capacity has tightened, and shippers have been forced to pay more, with some lanes almost doubling in price over the past year.

 

Many carriers have increased their rate per mile pay because of this, but that isn’t necessarily the only way to guarantee more money. Owner-operators can work on a percentage basis, which often turns out to be more lucrative than mileage pay. If a driver is working for a carrier that refuses to increase his wage, there are plenty of other companies out there that are rewarding their drivers. The country is experiencing a shortage of drivers due to the increase in manufacturing, so it is a great time to look for new suitors if a driver feels that he is being mistreated.

 

By taking advantage of a thriving market, drivers can use the ELD mandate to become more profitable while driving fewer miles. Not only will their wallets benefit, but they will become healthier and more well-rested. While there have undoubtedly been some growing pains in adjusting to the mandate, opportunities abound throughout the industry thanks to many of its positive attributes.

 

 

 

 

© 2018 Logiflex Inc

Blog.

A Guide to HAZMAT Trucking Responsibilities

A Guide to HAZMAT Trucking Responsibilities HAZMAT trucking is defined as the transportation of radioactive, flammable, explosive or even poisonous materials. However, did you...

→ Read More

6 HAZMAT Securement Strategies for Freight Carriers

6 HAZMAT Securement Strategies for Freight Carriers It’s crucial that HAZMAT drivers are taking the necessary precautions to transport freight safely. Everything carried in...

→ Read More

How to Become a Hazmat Certified Truck Driver

How to Become a Hazmat Certified Truck Driver Whether you’re taking a leap into trucking or simply exploring what it takes to become a...

→ Read More

The Top 5 Best Safety Practices for HAZMAT Carriers

The Top 5 Best Safety Practices for HAZMAT Carriers From batteries and antifreeze to paint and cleaning agents, various materials fall under the category...

→ Read More

AOBRD vs. ELD

AOBRD vs. ELD: What's the Difference? An automatic onboarding recording device is a piece of hardware that connects to the vehicle's engine to record driver's...

→ Read More

Quarterly Bonuses for Our Drivers

Driving a truck is a challenging job. Many drivers feel that they are not paid what they are worth considering the amount of work...

→ Read More

How the ELD Mandate Helps Drivers

  The ELD mandate has been a controversial subject among truckers, shippers, and manufacturers alike. Many drivers have complained that it places unfair restrictions...

→ Read More