October 19, 2022No Comments

How to Improve Drayage Efficiency With Localized Warehousing

Warehouse efficiency relies on smooth transitions from one stage of the shipping process to the next. When delays occur, they not only slow down the flow of that specific load but can also cause delays with additional orders, quickly creating a snowball effect. Long dwell durations and port delays are discouraged by per diem and excess detention penalties. Proper drayage training and procedures can help simplify loading and unloading processes while lowering the likelihood of per diem and other drayage charges, which can quickly add up.

Read more

February 25, 2022No Comments

EPA preparing nationwide truck emissions regulation

The Biden administration will soon propose a regulation to cut nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from heavy-duty trucks. It would be the first such regulation since 2001.
The Environmental Protection Agency “is working on a proposed rule to reduce pollution from heavy-duty vehicles and engines that would significantly cut NOx emissions and update [greenhouse gas] standards for certain categories,” EPA spokesman Rick Conger for FreightWaves.

“These standards, currently subject to interagency review, will be rooted in the latest science and the law.”
Separately, Conger noted, the EPA is working to finalize a decision to restore a California waiver — which had been revoked under the Trump administration. It allows the state to set its own more restrictive emissions standards.

Conger did not confirm reports that EPA’s new NOx regulation will be based on California’s Advanced Clean Truck Regulations, which will affect decisions on buying new trucks beginning with the 2024 model year. A certain percentage of those trucks will need to meet the definitions of zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs).
The most aggressive number for ZEV requirements under ACT is Class 4-8 trucks, ranging from 14,000 to 33,000 pounds. That requirement is that 9% in that class will be ZEVs in the model year 2024 and 75% by the year 2035. But for Class 7-8 tractors, it’s a 5% requirement in 2024, rising to 40% by the 2032 model year.


The Biden administration recently announced $5 billion in program funds for states to install electric vehicle charging stations. A portion of that could potentially be reserved for commercial truck operations. California’s definition of ZEVs is largely battery-powered vehicles, with a small opening for hydrogen-powered fuel cells.
OEMs “will have to figure out how to adjust — the high cost is figuring out the technology to get to the reduction goals,” said Brett Marston. He specializes in environmental risks to businesses at the law firm Wiley Rein.
“During the comment period, I’m sure OEMs will lay out the additional cost per vehicle, and I would expect that cost to be passed down to the truckers.

On the flip side, if they do it for the model after the California regs, it means it will be easier for the OEMs because they won’t have to follow two types of rules.”
Another ACT provision requires large employers, including retailers, manufacturers, and brokers, to report information about shipments.

Fleet owners with 50 or more trucks must report on their existing fleet operations.

“This information will help identify future strategies to ensure that fleets purchase available zero-emission trucks and place them in service were suitable to meet their needs,” according to the California Air Resources Board (CARB).

January 26, 2022No Comments

Inflation 2022: What would it mean for trucking?

However, we are already seeing the highest, fastest inflation growth in decades. If the driver shortage persists, no matter the number of imported goods, they still won't reach the consumers, and prices and inflation will continue to rage.

Read more

December 20, 2021No Comments

Can the new White House trucking plan help fix the drivers shortage?

Trucking Action Plan aims to resolve the immediate driver shortage but some critics say that the plan is not addressing the most critical issue - retention. 

Read more

May 28, 2019No Comments

International Roadcheck 2019

2019 International Roadcheck is Coming!

The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s International Road check 2019 will take place on June 4-6. During this time, over 10,000 U.S. federal, state, local and Canadian provincial officers will perform Level I inspections. Inspections will be around the clock for 72 hours. The inspections involve a comprehensive 37-step procedure. These inspections could result in violations and fines for unprepared fleets and their drivers.

This year’s Road check will focus on steering and suspension systems.

"Steering and suspension are safety critical systems for any commercial motor vehicle. Not only do they support the heavy loads carried by trucks and buses, but they also help maintain stability and control under acceleration and braking, keeping the vehicle safely on the road," said Jay Thompson CVSA president and chief with the Arkansas Highway Police. "Furthermore, they keep tires in alignment, reducing chances of uneven tire wear and possible tire failure, and they maximize the contact between the tires and the road to provide steering stability and good handling."

What to Expect

During International Roadcheck, CVSA-certified inspectors will primarily conduct the North American Standard Level I Inspection, a 37-step procedure that includes an examination of driver operating requirements and vehicle mechanical fitness. Inspectors may opt to conduct the Level II Walk-Around Driver/Vehicle Inspection, Level III Driver/Credential/Administrative Inspection or Level V Vehicle-Only Inspection.

The vehicle inspection includes checking critical inspection items such as: brake systems; cargo securement; coupling devices; drive-line/driveshaft; driver's seat (missing); exhaust systems; frames; fuel systems; lighting devices (headlamps, tail lamps, stop lamps, turn signals and lamps/flags on projecting loads); steering mechanisms; suspensions; tires; van and open-top trailer bodies; wheels, rims and hubs; windshield wipers. Additional items on buses, motorcoaches, passenger vans or other passenger-carrying vehicles include emergency exits, electrical cables, and systems in the engine and battery compartments, and seating (temporary and aisle seats).

Requirements

Drivers will be required to provide their driver's license (operating credentials), Medical Examiner's Certificate and Skill Performance Evaluation Certificate (if applicable), driver’s record of duty status and vehicle inspection report(s) (if applicable). Inspectors will also check drivers for seat belt usage, sickness, fatigue, and apparent alcohol and/or drug impairment.

If no critical item violations are found during a Level  I or V inspection a CVSA decal will be applied to the vehicle. This will indicate that the vehicle successfully passed a decal-eligible inspection conducted by a CVSA-certified inspector. However, when a rear impact guard is required and violations are present, a CVSA decal shall not be issued.

“Aside from the increased inspections, we are not doing anything different than any other day. The inspections performed during International Roadcheck are the same inspections that are conducted the day before International Roadcheck starts and the day after it concludes, as well as any other day of the year,” said Thompson. "It's important to remember that inspections are conducted 365 days a year. We publicly announce the dates of this three-day enforcement and awareness initiative in advance because we want all vehicles on our roadways to be safe and compliant."

January 25, 2019No Comments

Diesel Anti Gel: Why you should use it!

Diesel Anti Gel

There’s a lot of upsides to diesel fuel. More vehicular power, greater fuel economy, but Read more

December 7, 2018No Comments

When Do I Get Paid?

One of the first questions asked during orientation. Our payroll workweeks begin each Saturday and end on Friday's. Each Friday you will receive an email statement with a copy of your pay stub. These emails are highly important! They are confirming the loads and mileage you will be paid. Furthermore, check your bank account the following Monday as your check will be there.

When do I get payed calendar

 

 

5 Ways to read your paycheck:

  1. Load - This will be the Trip number.
  2. Date -  Date of the load.
  3. Trip Information - City delivered, miles that were driven, empty miles, etc.
  4. Rate per mile- Pay per mile.
  5. Total Pay -  Pay breakdown of each trip.

 

When do I get payed

 

When in doubt...

Call your dispatcher right away!

 

 

 

 

© 2018 Logiflex Inc

Blog / Fleet Management

How to Improve Drayage Efficiency With Localized Warehousing

Warehouse efficiency relies on smooth transitions from one stage of the shipping process to the next. When delays occur, they not only slow down...

→ Read More

EPA preparing nationwide truck emissions regulation

The Biden administration will soon propose a regulation to cut nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from heavy-duty trucks. It would be the first such regulation...

→ Read More

Inflation 2022: What would it mean for trucking?

However, we are already seeing the highest, fastest inflation growth in decades. If the driver shortage persists, no matter the number of imported goods,...

→ Read More

Can the new White House trucking plan help fix the drivers shortage?

Trucking Action Plan aims to resolve the immediate driver shortage but some critics say that the plan is not addressing the most critical issue...

→ Read More

International Roadcheck 2019

2019 International Roadcheck is Coming! The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s International Road check 2019 will take place on June 4-6. During this time, over...

→ Read More

Diesel Anti Gel: Why you should use it!

Diesel Anti Gel There’s a lot of upsides to diesel fuel. More vehicular power, greater fuel economy, but

→ Read More

When Do I Get Paid?

One of the first questions asked during orientation. Our payroll workweeks begin each Saturday and end on Friday's. Each Friday you will receive an...

→ Read More