September 3, 2018No Comments

How to Become a Hazmat Certified Truck Driver

How to Become a Hazmat Certified Truck Driver

Whether you’re taking a leap into trucking or simply exploring what it takes to become a HAZMAT certified truck driver, it’s important to educate yourself on the components involved in the certification process. Read more

August 29, 20184 Comments

AOBRD vs. ELD

AOBRD vs. ELD: What's the Difference?

An automatic onboarding recording device is a piece of hardware that connects to the vehicle's engine to record driver's hours-of-service (HOS). It functions much like an electronic logging device (ELD) except it records and displays less data. Similar to AOBRD, an ELD is a piece of hardware that connects to the vehicle's ECM to accurately record the driver's HOS.

However, AOBRD vs. ELD differs regarding how much data they record and how much you can edit. The chart below summarizes the FMCSA's comparison chart.

                AOBRD                   ELD
What is Recorded
  •   Date and Time
  •   Engine Hours
  •   Vehicle Miles
  •   Drive Times
  •   Locations
  •   Duty Status
  •  Date and Time
  •  Engine Hours
  •  Vehicle Miles
  •  Locations
  •  Information on the driver, motor carrier, vehicle, duty status, logging in and out, engine on and off, malfunctions
Locations
  •  Recorded during each change of duty status
  •  Can be entered manually
Automatically recorded when:

  • Change on duty status
  •  60 minutes interval while driving
  •  When the engine is off and on
  •  At the start and end of yard moves and personal conveyance
Edit History
  • Records who made an edit and when
  • Does not readily display edit history
  •  Records who made an edit and when
  •   All edits require annotation
  •  Automatically recorded events cannot be changed – only annotated
  •  Readily displays edit history to DOT inspectors
Driving Time
  •  Driving time can only be edited when attributed to the wrong driver
  •  Driving time cannot be edited

ELDs Are More Restrictive Than AOBRDs

The rules surrounding ELDs are specific on how the device must handle particular events and situations. ELDs automatically switch the driver's duty status to "On-Duty, Not driving, whenever their vehicle has stopped moving for five consecutive minutes, and the driver has not responded to the prompt within 60 seconds. In contrast, AOBRDs are not changing the driver's duty status when the vehicle is no longer in motion.

In addition, ELDs have to warn drivers about any unassigned driving time and miles that the device records when they log into the ELD. Electronic logging devices accounts for all vehicle miles (even if a mechanic takes the vehicle for a test drive) to ensure driver logs are accurate, which means ELDs are far more restrictive than AOBRDs.

FMCSA will allow the use of AOBRDs until December 16, 2019, on the condition that the truck had AOBRD since before the mandate; that is, before December 18, 2017. Any additions to the fleet after December 18, 2017, require ELD and not AOBRD.

May 30, 20189 Comments

How to Extend the 14 Hour Rule Using the Sleeper Berth Provision

How to Extend the 14 Hour Rule Using the Sleeper Berth Provision

Drivers and dispatchers alike find the 14 hour rule extension a bit confusing, so people don't use it. The sleeper berth provision is one of the most complex hours of service regulations. Using it correctly, however, offers some significant benefits. We wrote this article, hoping it will help explain the flexibility afforded by the so-called “8 and 2 split”. Read more

May 18, 201826 Comments

DOT Regulations in Event of Electronic Logging Device Malfunction

DOT Regulations in Event of Electronic Logging Device Malfunction

What should drivers do, when their elog malfunctions? FMCSA has listed the ELD rules and DOT regulations on their website. Drivers must follow these rules and should not tamper with their devices.

"1. Note the malfunction of the ELD and provide written notice of the malfunction to the motor carrier within 24 hours;"

In plain English, the driver must send a text or email to his trucking company.

"2. Reconstruct the record of duty status (RODS) for the current 24-hour period and the previous 7 consecutive days, and record the records of duty status on graph-grid paper logs that comply with 49 CFR 395.8, unless the driver already has the records or retrieves them from the ELD;"

The driver has to have a copy of his previous seven days + today. The trucking company can fax or email copies of the logs. The driver must carry paper logs in his permit book.

"3. Continue to manually prepare RODS in accordance with 49 CFR 395.8 until the ELD is serviced and back in compliance. The recording of the driver’s hours of service on a paper log cannot continue for more than 8 days after the malfunction; a driver that continues to record his or her hours of service on a paper log beyond 8 days risk being placed out of service."

Once the driver obtains copies of his previous logs, he can continue using a paper logbook. However, someone must take care of the problem with the broken device. Paper logs are good for only eight days.

Owner-operators are not exempt. Hence they must obey these ELD rules and DOT regulations. The trucking industry is not the same after the ELD mandate.

May 18, 20184 Comments

What do truck drivers need to have in their permit folder?

Whether we call it a permit book, a paperwork binder or a document folder you keep one in your truck. Have you had an inspection turn south because of missing paperwork? We know we have! We sat down and made this list of what truck drivers need in their permit folder.

MC Authority

It shows your company's registration with the DOT and authorizes you to transport freight. It lists your company name and motor carrier number.

Certificate of Insurance 

The title says it all. It lists your insurance company and policy numbers along with contacts for your agent. Keep in mind there are several policies on the same sheet. They might have different expiration dates, so be sure to check them all.

Truck registration

Lists your rig’s VIN, license plate, make and model as well as info on the registered owner. States issues IRP registrations annually, and they can be valid for single or multiple states. Just like with insurance, expiration dates are critical.

Annual inspection

Certified mechanics fill out these checklists. They confirm your equipment is operational and defect free. Annual means dates are important. Check for expiration. Yearly inspection stickers go on the side of your truck, but you also need the paper from inside your binder.

Lease agreement 

If you are an owner operator or drive a truck not registered under your company’s name, you need a lease agreement. These vary between a single page and multipage contracts. It's a document listing equipment ownership and lease terms.

IFTA

You need both stickers and a cab card. Both need annual updates and show company information and expiration dates. IFTA stickers change colors annually making it easy to spot outdated ones

Oregon permit 

While most states can check permit status by running your VIN, Oregon requires you to carry a paper copy in your truck. Kentucky and New Mexico no longer need hard copies and New York states now issue stickers. You can read more on the ODOT website.

ELD instructions 

Written instructions on how to operate your electronic logging device. The DOT mandates these have to be kept inside your truck and presented during an inspection.

Backup paper logs 

Again, mandated by the DOT in case of ELD failure. You need at least one week’s worth of driver logs or minimum of seven sheets. 

Hazmat permits

If your company is transporting Hazmat materials, you need to have the proper permits. For non-high-risk shipments, you need an FMCSA hazmat permit that certifies your company has the appropriate endorsements. These permits have expiration dates and can be valid for single or multiple years. In addition to the federal licensing requirements, individual states require separate hazmat permits. These states are Colorado, California, Idaho, West Virginia, Nevada, Oklahoma and Michigan (the last four share a single license). 

Read our guide to hazmat trucking

 

While truck drivers need trailer registration and annual inspections during DOT inspections, we advise against keeping them inside the cab. These go inside a box mounted on the nose of the trailer. We know drivers opt to keep them inside the cab for easy access, but this leads to problems. If you swap trailers, this paperwork stays with you and hence leaves the other driver without documents.

An excellent tip to keep your papers organized is a ringed binder with clear plastic sleeves. It will protects against rips and spills and keeps things within reach.

© 2018 Logiflex Inc

Blog / Permits

How to Become a Hazmat Certified Truck Driver

How to Become a Hazmat Certified Truck Driver Whether you’re taking a leap into trucking or simply exploring what it takes to become a...

→ Read More

AOBRD vs. ELD

AOBRD vs. ELD: What's the Difference? An automatic onboarding recording device is a piece of hardware that connects to the vehicle's engine to record driver's...

→ Read More

How to Extend the 14 Hour Rule Using the Sleeper Berth Provision

How to Extend the 14 Hour Rule Using the Sleeper Berth Provision Drivers and dispatchers alike find the 14 hour rule extension a bit...

→ Read More

DOT Regulations in Event of Electronic Logging Device Malfunction

DOT Regulations in Event of Electronic Logging Device Malfunction What should drivers do, when their elog malfunctions? FMCSA has listed the ELD rules and...

→ Read More

What do truck drivers need to have in their permit folder?

Whether we call it a permit book, a paperwork binder or a document folder you keep one in your truck. Have you had an...

→ Read More