September 3, 2020No Comments

The new HOS rules

Four major updates are coming to the hours-of-service rules for commercial drivers across the country. The changes, enforced by the FMCSA, will take effect on September 29.

Towards the end of this month, at 12:01 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, September 29, 2020, the new hours-of-service rules go into effect for commercial drivers across the country. The revised rules allow more flexibility for drivers and keep the focus on highway safety, according to the Acting Associate Administrator for Enforcement at the FMCSA.

Here are the four final FMCSA updates to the HOS rules:

  • The short-haul exception is increased from 100 to 150 air-miles and the permitted works shift is extended from 12 to 14 hours
  • The adverse driving conditions exception is modified by extending the maximum window during which driving is permitted by up to two more hours.
  • A 30-minute break is required after 8 hours of consecutive driving time and an on-duty/ not driving period is allowed to qualify as the required break
  • The sleeper berth exception is modified to allow a driver to meet the 10-hour minimum off-duty requirement by spending at least 7, rather than at least 8 hours of that period in the berth and a minimum off-duty period of at least 2 hours spent inside or outside of the berth, provided the two periods total at least 10 hours, and that neither qualifying period counts against the 14-hour driving window.

April 9, 2020No Comments

Tips for Truckers During the COVID-19 Pandemic

 

To Those Who Keep The Supply Chain Going Strong,

 

From all of us at Logiflex, we hope that you are staying safe and healthy amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. No matter where you live or where you travel to, the pandemic carries a heavyweight that we all feel. We would like to thank truck drivers and all those who are working tirelessly to keep the supply chain going strong and providing essentials to countless people. We know this time is challenging, which is why we put together some tips that can help you manage your mental health even on the front lines of delivery.

 

Ways to Manage Mental Health During the COVID-19 Pandemic

 

Set Limits on News Intake and Rely Only on Trusted Sources. 

You should limit the amount of time you spend watching, reading, or listening to the news. While it is essential to stay informed, too much exposure can cause more feelings of panic and fear. Even during this pandemic, when things change on a day-to-day basis, you must limit yourself. Try only watching news reports in the morning for 15 minutes or listen to updates during your lunch break. As for the information you are taking in, use reliable sources to obtain information. The Center for Disease Control (CDC)World Health Organization (WHO), or any local government news outlet are the best options for getting the most accurate and up-to-date information.

Recognize What Triggers Your Anxiety.

It is normal to feel emotional distress in the middle of all that is happening. There are high levels of uncertainty, and news changes daily. Emotions such as stress and anxiety can present themselves in some ways – even fatigue. It is essential that as a truck driver, you recognize your triggers for distress and take time for your mental health even while on the road.

 

Get Plenty of Rest. 

Common signs of high-stress levels, panic, and anxiety are fatigue, muscle tension, and difficulty resting. These physical symptoms can be paired with cognitive issues such as confusion and decreased concentration. It is crucial that truck drivers are well-rested and focused while they drive. Take the time to ensure that the sleep you get is quality sleep and that you are getting enough, if not more, rest than you usually would. Sleep will help your mind stay sharp and out of panic mode and will help keep your immune system healthy.

 

Be Prepared and Stay Educated. 

As a truck driver, you visit many public places and are suspectable to germs. Initiate healthy and preventive measures like the proper hand-washing techniquesneezing, and coughing etiquette, and if you have any pre-existing medical conditions, talk with your doctor about how you can best take care of yourself.

 

Get Set-Up With HealthiestYou.

Logiflex provides our drivers with HealthiestYou, an app that allows you to instantly connect with a doctor by phone or video 24/7 – all with a $0 copay. During the COVID-19 pandemic, this is a great resource that allows you to receive the medical care you need while on the road or even when you are at home. You can talk with therapists on the weekends by phone and video, which is another significant step for taking care of your mental health right now. HealthiestYou also allows you access to the lowest-cost prescriptions at pharmacies nearest to you. If you do not already have an account set up, you can start here.

 

Take Time For Things You Enjoy. 

You must allow yourself mental breaks to do the things that make you happy. Even if it is just a walk around the truck stop, getting exercise can help you fight off the sense of fatigue that comes with stress. Phone a loved one, get out in nature and enjoy fresh air, or watch your favorite TV show. Whatever it is you enjoy doing, making these things a priority will make your mental health a priority as well.

It is an uncertain and stressful time for everyone, but we must take care of our mental health to cope with the uncertainty. For more information on ways to manage anxiety and stress during the COVID-19 pandemic, check out the CDC’s article on dealing with the pandemic, or read these science-based tips to handle Coronavirus anxiety. Logiflex would like to thank again everyone who has dedicated themselves to delivering essentials and keeping the supply chain running strong amidst the chaos.

August 2, 2019No Comments

Strategies to Help Ease Your Road Rage

Strategies to Help Ease Your Road Rage

It is almost inevitable that you’ll face aggressive drivers, as an over the road trucker. We have all been victims of slow drivers, and drivers who forget to use their turn signals. These are the two most common frustrations we can face on the road. As a trucker, managing the urge to go nuts behind the wheel of a 50,000-pound machine is important.

One mistake can turn tragic quickly and rather than falling into the road rage trap how about you develop methods to ease your road raging urges. We know that frustration can be seen as part of the job, but it doesn’t have to be. Road rage has ended in death far too many times, whether a confrontation went wrong or a loss of focus and calmness being thrown out the window. The strategies below are effective ways to take help you manage. Next time you feel your blood boiling when you’re behind the wheel of your freight turn to these strategies and feel a sense of peace rush over you.

Control Is Out The Window

This is probably the hardest thing to face for individuals who need to be in control, but it’s absolutely true. You have no control over other drivers. The only thing we can control is how we react. Whether we react to a stoplight on time, react to a driver cutting us off, or in some cases flipping us off it is up to us to react in a manner that’s appropriate. Remembering that you have no control over other drivers helps you reflect more on what you can do better. Maybe you left late, now you tell yourself you have to speed to be on time. Instead of getting upset with drivers going the speed limit strategize on how you can leave on time.

Relax And Release

No matter where you’re headed it’s important to not arrive flustered. Meditating either in silence or with a playlist or podcast will keep your mind on other things. Remaining calm is the key to staying safe while performing your job.

We’re All Humans

It is quite easy to find ourselves frustrated when we get cut off, but choosing to not take those things personal help us to manage our inner need to lash out. Humans make mistakes. Some of the things we learned when we were 14 taking drivers-ed to go out the window when kids are kicking our back seat or we just spilled hot coffee in our laps. Life happens and mistakes do too. The best thing we can do is be grateful we stopped in time rather than shouting at the top of our lungs.

July 26, 2019No Comments

Pre-trip Inspection Tips

Pre-trip Inspection Guide

The pre-trip inspection is a very important part of every trip you take.

Remember, it is meant to be a thorough check of the semi-truck, trailer, and load, to ensure that everything correctly, prior to the truck driver, departing on a trip. Also, any damage or issues needing attention, are to be addressed before departure. To avoid stress and make your job easier this is a crucial part.

PRE-TRIP INSPECTION STEPS

Tip the hood of the truck

  • Check fluid levels: oil and coolant levels.
  • For the pre-trip, look for oil, fuel, coolant, power steering fluid leaks… The leak is either a problem or a potential problem.
  • Make sure caps are tight for the rad, oil filler, power steering fluid and the dip stick is seated properly.
  • Observe at the engine block.  Check for leaks, fluid running down the side of the engine.  Look at the hoses. Check for wear, cracking or fraying. Inspect fan belts for proper tension and signs of wear.
  • Take a look at the engine fan. Make sure there are no pieces out of any of the blades.
  • Look for any exposed or bare wires or wires which appear out of place.
  • Check windshield wiper fluid level.
  •  Scan steering axle tires for uneven wear, nails, etc.
  • Take a look at the shock absorbers, ball joints, and kingpins for wear and proper lubrication.

Leave the truck hood up – continue with a pre-trip inspection

  • Observe all tires on your rig as well as the trailer.
  • Visually inspect the airlines and electrical cord, to ensure they are properly connected
  • Visually check the 5th wheel to make sure it’s coupled to the trailer
  • Ensure the landing gear is ok, legs are up and secure, and crank handle is secure
  • Trailer suspension – airbags are up or no broken springs
  • Brake pads. Look for good thickness.
  • Brake adjustment indicators. Look for proper positioning.
  • Look over the entire unit thoroughly for body damage.

Start the vehicle

  • Depress the clutch and start the engine. ( in neutral)
  • Observe gauges to be sure oil pressure is a good and electrical system in charging
  • Gently ease the clutch out slowly and carefully, just in case there’s a problem (if you do this too quickly, you could launch yourself across the parking lot).
  • Do not high idle the truck right away. Let it idle at 650 RPM
  • A glance at the gauges again to ensure all is ok and air pressure is building.
  • Turn on all lights and flashers and exit the vehicle.
  • Do a visual of the motor, looking for leaks
  • Observe belts for proper tension and that they are turning properly
  • Close the hood and lock it down.

This is a good way to test the foot brake is operating correctly.

  • Be certain all lights for proper function on truck and trailer.
  • In the truck, use a piece of wood or find a way to depress the brake pedal, so the operation of the exterior lights can be checked
  • Listen for air leaks as you walk around the unit.
  • Remove the block of wood from the pedal, turn off lights not needed.

Back up a few feet

(Be sure you’ve already checked behind the trailer!)

Pull forward about 6 feet.

Then, pull ahead 6 more feet and stop the truck with the foot brake.

Pull the trailer brake, to ensure it’s working properly and to make sure the fifth wheel is correctly coupled to the trailer.  This helps ensure that all trailer wheels are turning.

Then, and only then, complete required documentation on the logbooks, for pre-inspection report/circle check.
CDL training schools teach this process of the pre-trip inspection in detail, and most have their own version of the inspection.
Keep in mind, any problems encountered should be addressed before beginning the trip and indicated on the logbook pre-trip inspection report.
As the driver of the vehicle, you are responsible for this vehicle report. If you find the vehicle has issues, have them fixed before departing.
Be thorough with the inspection. Your life depends on it!

 

July 3, 2019No Comments

Summer Driving Safety Tips for Truck Drivers

Summer Driving Safety Tips for Truck Drivers

Summer has arrived ladies and gentlemen and it's off to a hot start! We have talked about winter safety tips and how important it is to keep up with routine maintenance during the winter, but it is as equally important to do so in the summer. Today, I want to share some quick tips about Summer driving safety and what you can do to make life on the road a bit smoother. No matter where you are headed these tips might be helpful to you or someone you know. Here are some quick Summer Driving safety tips for Truck Drivers. Read more

May 7, 2019No Comments

Cargo Securement: Is your Cargo Secure?

CARGO SECUREMENT

As you may know, cargo being transported on the highway must remain
secured on or within the transporting vehicle. When most people think about cargo securement, their thoughts turn to flatbed trailers because they get the bulk of these types of violations. However, compliance with federal cargo securement regulations is very important and required on all commercial operating vehicles. Violations can have serious consequences! The regulations also apply to covered van loads. For too many drivers, this means, “out of sight, out of mind.”  Properly secured cargo prevents items from shifting, spilling, blowing or falling from the vehicle. That is critical. Appropriate load securement is also a necessity to avoid lost dollars in damaged goods. Preventing your Read more

April 29, 2019No Comments

How to Properly Open and Close Trailer Doors

How to Properly Close Trailer Doors

I came across a video online about trailer doors that sparked my interest to write this article.

At first, the video seemed like it could be funny. However, the person was hit pretty hard and raised some concern in my head. I want to explain how to properly open trailer doors. I know it seems kind of silly as many of you might have learned this during the course of your CDL class but it is crucial to your safety. Did you know? Opening and closing trailer doors are two of the leading causes of work-related injuries for truck drivers. Read the information below, and ask yourself if there are actions you can take to protect yourself from harm. Let's look at some factors that can affect the ability on how to properly open and close trailer doors. Read more

© 2018 Logiflex Inc

Blog / Safety

The new HOS rules

Four major updates are coming to the hours-of-service rules for commercial drivers across the country. The changes, enforced by the FMCSA, will take effect...

→ Read More

Tips for Truckers During the COVID-19 Pandemic

  To Those Who Keep The Supply Chain Going Strong,   From all of us at Logiflex, we hope that you are staying safe...

→ Read More

Strategies to Help Ease Your Road Rage

Strategies to Help Ease Your Road Rage It is almost inevitable that you’ll face aggressive drivers, as an over the road trucker. We have...

→ Read More

Pre-trip Inspection Tips

Pre-trip Inspection Guide The pre-trip inspection is a very important part of every trip you take. Remember, it is meant to be a thorough...

→ Read More

Summer Driving Safety Tips for Truck Drivers

Summer Driving Safety Tips for Truck Drivers Summer has arrived ladies and gentlemen and it's off to a hot start! We have talked about...

→ Read More

Cargo Securement: Is your Cargo Secure?

CARGO SECUREMENT As you may know, cargo being transported on the highway must remain secured on or within the transporting vehicle. When most people think...

→ Read More

How to Properly Open and Close Trailer Doors

How to Properly Close Trailer Doors I came across a video online about trailer doors that sparked my interest to write this article. At...

→ Read More