May 14, 2022No Comments

DOT Week 2022: What to expect and how to get ready.

As you already know, the International Roadcheck 2022, also known as DOT week 2022, is coming this week (May 17-19) to Mexico, Canada, and the USA. 

Because the truckload market is experiencing inflation, this year's event may cause more significant disruption than usual, resulting in capacity constraints and spot pricing volatility. 

Below is everything you need to know about the upcoming inspection and tips on how to get ready for it. 

What will happen?

During International Roadcheck, inspectors will conduct a 37-step procedure that includes examining driver operating requirements & vehicle mechanical fitness. Enforcement officials will perform an average of 15 vehicle inspections per minute during this yearly 72-hour event. 

ELD compliance, tire treads, breaks, exhausts, suspensions, lighting, and other aspects of trucks and drivers are all scrutinized. 

If an inspector discovers anything wrong, from worn tire treads and busted tail lights to Hours of Service and licensing breaches, the carrier faces fines, a lower safety rating, and/or suspension until the problem is rectified.

How to get ready? 

Organize yourself: Inspectors with the Department of Transportation recommend making your documentation easier to inspect. Put all of your paperwork in a binder or folder so that the inspector may go over them all at once. You'll appear more organized and professional, and you'll be on your way in less time. 

Maintain a tidy truck and know where everything is — The DOT inspector will notice if your truck cab is in disarray and may interpret it as an indication that you aren't maintaining other things in order. A clean and ordered vehicle communicates that you value your equipment and keep it well maintained.

Be patient as the process unfolds.

We understand that you're eager to get on the road and finish your work, but please be patient and kind to inspectors; they're simply doing their job. You'll be asked to pull over first. If you're at a weigh station, they might have an inspection area set aside for you. If you don't, you might as well pull over to the side of the road. Depending on the degree of inspection, you may be required to exit the car and get additional instructions from the inspector. You can go on your journey if you pass the examination. If you fail, you may be placed on "out of service," which means you will be unable to work until the issues are rectified.

LEVEL I INSPECTION

A Level I inspection will evaluate your driver's license, medical examiner's certificate, driver's record of duty/ELD status (hours of service), annual inspection papers, hazardous materials paperwork, and permit credentials.

Cargo securement; coupling devices; driveline/driveshaft mechanisms; frames; hazardous materials compliance; lighting devices (headlights, taillights, turn signals, etc.); steering tools; suspensions; tires (including hubs, rims, and wheels); van and open-top trailer bodies; and windshield wiper operation is all part of the vehicle inspection.

LEVEL V INSPECTION (VEHICLE ONLY INSPECTION )

A Level V examination contains all of the items included in a Level I North American Standard Inspection but does not need the presence of a driver.


The below list from the CVSA helps carriers for a successful inspection during the International Roadcheck event:

  • Check tires for proper inflation, cuts and bulges, regrooved tires on the steering axle, tread wear, and major tread groove depth
  • Inspect sidewalls for improper repairs, exposed fabric or cord, contact with any part of the vehicle, and tire marking excluding it from use on a steering axle
  • Check for missing, non-functioning, loose, contaminated, or cracked parts on the brake system.
  • Check the safety devices for sufficient strength, missing components, improper repairs, and devices incapable of secure attachment.
  • Check fuel tanks for loose mounting, leaks, missing caps, and signs of leaking fuel below the tank.
  • Inspect for corrosion fatigue; cracked, loose, or missing cross members; cracks in the frame; missing or defective vehicle parts.
  • Inspect the suspension for indications of misaligned, shifted, cracked, or missing springs; loose shackles; missing bolts; unsecured spring hangers, and cracked or lose U-bolts

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May 14, 2022No Comments

DOT Week 2022: What to expect and how to get ready.

During International Roadcheck, inspectors will conduct a 37-step procedure that includes examining driver operating requirements & vehicle mechanical fitness. Enforcement officials will perform an average of 15 vehicle inspections per minute during this yearly 72-hour event. 

Written by Trucking Update

As you already know, the International Roadcheck 2022, also known as DOT week 2022, is coming this week (May 17-19) to Mexico, Canada, and the USA. 

Because the truckload market is experiencing inflation, this year's event may cause more significant disruption than usual, resulting in capacity constraints and spot pricing volatility. 

Below is everything you need to know about the upcoming inspection and tips on how to get ready for it. 

What will happen?

During International Roadcheck, inspectors will conduct a 37-step procedure that includes examining driver operating requirements & vehicle mechanical fitness. Enforcement officials will perform an average of 15 vehicle inspections per minute during this yearly 72-hour event. 

ELD compliance, tire treads, breaks, exhausts, suspensions, lighting, and other aspects of trucks and drivers are all scrutinized. 

If an inspector discovers anything wrong, from worn tire treads and busted tail lights to Hours of Service and licensing breaches, the carrier faces fines, a lower safety rating, and/or suspension until the problem is rectified.

How to get ready? 

Organize yourself: Inspectors with the Department of Transportation recommend making your documentation easier to inspect. Put all of your paperwork in a binder or folder so that the inspector may go over them all at once. You'll appear more organized and professional, and you'll be on your way in less time. 

Maintain a tidy truck and know where everything is — The DOT inspector will notice if your truck cab is in disarray and may interpret it as an indication that you aren't maintaining other things in order. A clean and ordered vehicle communicates that you value your equipment and keep it well maintained.

Be patient as the process unfolds.

We understand that you're eager to get on the road and finish your work, but please be patient and kind to inspectors; they're simply doing their job. You'll be asked to pull over first. If you're at a weigh station, they might have an inspection area set aside for you. If you don't, you might as well pull over to the side of the road. Depending on the degree of inspection, you may be required to exit the car and get additional instructions from the inspector. You can go on your journey if you pass the examination. If you fail, you may be placed on "out of service," which means you will be unable to work until the issues are rectified.

LEVEL I INSPECTION

A Level I inspection will evaluate your driver's license, medical examiner's certificate, driver's record of duty/ELD status (hours of service), annual inspection papers, hazardous materials paperwork, and permit credentials.

Cargo securement; coupling devices; driveline/driveshaft mechanisms; frames; hazardous materials compliance; lighting devices (headlights, taillights, turn signals, etc.); steering tools; suspensions; tires (including hubs, rims, and wheels); van and open-top trailer bodies; and windshield wiper operation is all part of the vehicle inspection.

LEVEL V INSPECTION (VEHICLE ONLY INSPECTION )

A Level V examination contains all of the items included in a Level I North American Standard Inspection but does not need the presence of a driver.


The below list from the CVSA helps carriers for a successful inspection during the International Roadcheck event:

  • Check tires for proper inflation, cuts and bulges, regrooved tires on the steering axle, tread wear, and major tread groove depth
  • Inspect sidewalls for improper repairs, exposed fabric or cord, contact with any part of the vehicle, and tire marking excluding it from use on a steering axle
  • Check for missing, non-functioning, loose, contaminated, or cracked parts on the brake system.
  • Check the safety devices for sufficient strength, missing components, improper repairs, and devices incapable of secure attachment.
  • Check fuel tanks for loose mounting, leaks, missing caps, and signs of leaking fuel below the tank.
  • Inspect for corrosion fatigue; cracked, loose, or missing cross members; cracks in the frame; missing or defective vehicle parts.
  • Inspect the suspension for indications of misaligned, shifted, cracked, or missing springs; loose shackles; missing bolts; unsecured spring hangers, and cracked or lose U-bolts

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