June 1, 20188 Comments

DOT hours of service extended by recapturing your hours

Extend your 70-hour workweek by recapturing your hours

Commercial drivers often refer to DOT hours of service regulations as their three clocks. The eleven, fourteen and seventeen-hour “clocks” have to do with with the amount of driving and on duty hours allowed daily and over the course of a week. As we have already explained it is possible to extend the number of daily hours, beyond the DOT mandated 14-hour rule. In this article, we will show you the DOT regulation for how to extend your 70-hour workweek by recapturing your hours.

34-hour reset

Drivers of commercial motor vehicles are required to stop driving, once they have accumulated 60 on-duty hours over seven consecutive days, or 70 on-duty hours over eight consecutive days. Drivers need to take an extended 34-hour break to “restart” their clocks. That break effectively resets their on-duty hours back to zero.

Running on recap

A 34-hour reset is an option for drivers to zero out there on duty clock. However, it is not a requirement and DOT regulation have an alternative. Truck drivers can keep a running total of their hours over the past 7 or 8 days and do the math each day to see where they stand about the DOT hours of service limit.

Here’s how it works

Let’s say you start your week on Monday with “fresh hours,” following a 34-hour reset. For convenience’s sake, we’ll assume you log 8,5 on-duty hours each day—from your first day on the job until the following Monday. Hence, you’ll have accumulated 68 hours on-duty. When you roll into Tuesday, your Day 8 shifts from the Monday of last week to Tuesday. And the 8-1/2 hours that just fell off your rolling total are now available to you again. DOT hours of service are not that complicated after all.

It's as simple as that. With each passing day, you re-capture (or recap) the same amount of on-duty hours you logged 8 days ago. Just like the DOT regulation for sleeper berth provision, this duty hour extension is not practical for every situation, but it indeed allows for great flexibility with some careful planning.

For information about Personal, Conveyance provision read here.

For Information about ELD malfunction read here. 

Comments

Rbrtrt8 gmail says:

They suck every last minute of your 14 hour clock and your 11 hour clock because they don’t know what there doing. They are basically just putting out fires.

Craig says:

Exactly Jeff. I agree

Jim says:

I used to drive otr using this method to recover hours. Problem is you have to pretty much keep your driving to 8 hrs more or less. You can drive forever like that if you have no home and no life. Also it really won’t put more money in your pocket and dispatch bitches. Cause your leaving unused time on your clock everyday.

James says:

The problem is most you jerks making these laws have never even sat in a truck, let alone drove one through a major city. The majority of accidents are not cause by truck drivers, they’re cause by four wheelers that don’t understand how much distance it take to stop an 80,000 lb vehicle that operates air brake. It don’t help either that insurance companies are biased against truck driver and blame them the majority of the time even when it’s clearly not the drivers fault. Cutting a check to the other driver for doing something stupid. How bout you educate regular drivers in drivers ed first. You might get better results

Glenn says:

Better to be quite and thought a fool than open your mouth and remove all doubt!

Me says:

We go on strike. Been hearing that for over 30 years of my career. Never happened nor will get solidarity. Would shut the country down immediately. Too many graduates and poop companies that it will never happen. Just my opinion.

Steve McDonald says:

I don’t know a truck driver who can only work 8 hours a day to continue working every day past his 8 days . F you are driving 11 hours a day you can only work six days out of eight. Or use restart after six and take off 34 hours . To start over with fresh eight days .

Ken says:

Lol a perfect situation in a perfect world. That is the problem with people who make comments and the D O T and all the other entities that want to fleece the American Trucker…If it was that simple we would do it that way. All you are doing is insulting our intelligence we do not need to be babysat. We’re all adults here. Maybe you need a reality check as in come drive with me on on one run out and one run back. You will not believe you eyes as in what you people put us through.

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June 1, 20188 Comments

DOT hours of service extended by recapturing your hours

Commercial drivers often times refer to DOT hours of service regulations as their 3 clocks. The eleven, fourteen and seventeen hour “clocks” have to do with with the amount of driving and on duty hours allowed daily and over the course of a week.

Written by Mike

Dot hours of service

Extend your 70-hour workweek by recapturing your hours

Commercial drivers often refer to DOT hours of service regulations as their three clocks. The eleven, fourteen and seventeen-hour “clocks” have to do with with the amount of driving and on duty hours allowed daily and over the course of a week. As we have already explained it is possible to extend the number of daily hours, beyond the DOT mandated 14-hour rule. In this article, we will show you the DOT regulation for how to extend your 70-hour workweek by recapturing your hours.

34-hour reset

Drivers of commercial motor vehicles are required to stop driving, once they have accumulated 60 on-duty hours over seven consecutive days, or 70 on-duty hours over eight consecutive days. Drivers need to take an extended 34-hour break to “restart” their clocks. That break effectively resets their on-duty hours back to zero.

Running on recap

A 34-hour reset is an option for drivers to zero out there on duty clock. However, it is not a requirement and DOT regulation have an alternative. Truck drivers can keep a running total of their hours over the past 7 or 8 days and do the math each day to see where they stand about the DOT hours of service limit.

Here’s how it works

Let’s say you start your week on Monday with “fresh hours,” following a 34-hour reset. For convenience’s sake, we’ll assume you log 8,5 on-duty hours each day—from your first day on the job until the following Monday. Hence, you’ll have accumulated 68 hours on-duty. When you roll into Tuesday, your Day 8 shifts from the Monday of last week to Tuesday. And the 8-1/2 hours that just fell off your rolling total are now available to you again. DOT hours of service are not that complicated after all.

It's as simple as that. With each passing day, you re-capture (or recap) the same amount of on-duty hours you logged 8 days ago. Just like the DOT regulation for sleeper berth provision, this duty hour extension is not practical for every situation, but it indeed allows for great flexibility with some careful planning.

For information about Personal, Conveyance provision read here.

For Information about ELD malfunction read here. 

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  • Ken says:

    Lol a perfect situation in a perfect world. That is the problem with people who make comments and the D O T and all the other entities that want to fleece the American Trucker…If it was that simple we would do it that way. All you are doing is insulting our intelligence we do not need to be babysat. We’re all adults here. Maybe you need a reality check as in come drive with me on on one run out and one run back. You will not believe you eyes as in what you people put us through.

  • Steve McDonald says:

    I don’t know a truck driver who can only work 8 hours a day to continue working every day past his 8 days . F you are driving 11 hours a day you can only work six days out of eight. Or use restart after six and take off 34 hours . To start over with fresh eight days .

  • Me says:

    We go on strike. Been hearing that for over 30 years of my career. Never happened nor will get solidarity. Would shut the country down immediately. Too many graduates and poop companies that it will never happen. Just my opinion.

  • Glenn says:

    Better to be quite and thought a fool than open your mouth and remove all doubt!

  • James says:

    The problem is most you jerks making these laws have never even sat in a truck, let alone drove one through a major city. The majority of accidents are not cause by truck drivers, they’re cause by four wheelers that don’t understand how much distance it take to stop an 80,000 lb vehicle that operates air brake. It don’t help either that insurance companies are biased against truck driver and blame them the majority of the time even when it’s clearly not the drivers fault. Cutting a check to the other driver for doing something stupid. How bout you educate regular drivers in drivers ed first. You might get better results

  • Jim says:

    I used to drive otr using this method to recover hours. Problem is you have to pretty much keep your driving to 8 hrs more or less. You can drive forever like that if you have no home and no life. Also it really won’t put more money in your pocket and dispatch bitches. Cause your leaving unused time on your clock everyday.

  • Craig says:

    Exactly Jeff. I agree

  • Rbrtrt8 gmail says:

    They suck every last minute of your 14 hour clock and your 11 hour clock because they don’t know what there doing. They are basically just putting out fires.

  • Leave a Reply

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