April 27, 2022No Comments

U.S. States leaders in the electric transformation of trucking

After electric cars picked up steam in the USA regulators are now increasingly turning their attention to

After electric cars picked up steam in the USA, regulators are increasingly turning their attention to the big rigs to cut down on motor vehicle pollution. Some states on both coasts are leading the transition towards electric trucks.
New Jersey, New York, and Massachusetts have already implemented the Advanced Clean Trucks rule, following California, Oregon, and Washington. The law requires manufacturers of commercial pickup trucks to giant 18-wheelers steadily increase their electric sales in those states starting in 2025.

US map of states that adopted the Advance Clean Trucking Rule (ACT) and states that have indicated that they might adopt it

The 6 states, all of which are leaders in the fight against climate change, are perfect examples of a policy that cleans and grows the economy. Environmental justice organizations, climate advocates, and large corporations have endorsed the Advanced Clean Trucks rule. The ACT rule shows that sustainability and corporate interests are not far off.

Trucks account for only 10% of US traffic but at the same time generate over 25% of our roads' gas emissions.

Big Rigs also contribute to increased levels of dangerous air pollution, which causes heart, lung, and respiratory ailments, particularly in poorer neighborhoods near highways, major roads, and essential maritime ports.

Many major corporations and their investors are particularly enthusiastic about the move to electric fleets, seeing it as a significant opportunity to meet their own climate targets while saving money on gas and maintenance. Indeed, when those costs are taken into account, owning and operating an electric truck is already cheaper than owning and operating a gas-powered truck, and the difference is growing.

The problem is that many of the models that businesses require aren't scaleable, and some aren't even available.
The ACT rule aims to kickstart electric truck manufacturing by increasing production and sales volume, lowering prices, and making electric vehicles more affordable to make and buy. The more states adopt this strategy, the more likely it is to succeed. Currently, one out of five semi-trucks sold in the United States should comply with the ACT requirement, a statistic that will only increase as additional states embrace the law.

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April 27, 2022No Comments

U.S. States leaders in the electric transformation of trucking

New Jersey, New York, and Massachusetts have already implemented the Advanced Clean Trucks rule

Written by Trucking Update

After electric cars picked up steam in the USA regulators are now increasingly turning their attention to

After electric cars picked up steam in the USA, regulators are increasingly turning their attention to the big rigs to cut down on motor vehicle pollution. Some states on both coasts are leading the transition towards electric trucks.
New Jersey, New York, and Massachusetts have already implemented the Advanced Clean Trucks rule, following California, Oregon, and Washington. The law requires manufacturers of commercial pickup trucks to giant 18-wheelers steadily increase their electric sales in those states starting in 2025.

US map of states that adopted the Advance Clean Trucking Rule (ACT) and states that have indicated that they might adopt it

The 6 states, all of which are leaders in the fight against climate change, are perfect examples of a policy that cleans and grows the economy. Environmental justice organizations, climate advocates, and large corporations have endorsed the Advanced Clean Trucks rule. The ACT rule shows that sustainability and corporate interests are not far off.

Trucks account for only 10% of US traffic but at the same time generate over 25% of our roads' gas emissions.

Big Rigs also contribute to increased levels of dangerous air pollution, which causes heart, lung, and respiratory ailments, particularly in poorer neighborhoods near highways, major roads, and essential maritime ports.

Many major corporations and their investors are particularly enthusiastic about the move to electric fleets, seeing it as a significant opportunity to meet their own climate targets while saving money on gas and maintenance. Indeed, when those costs are taken into account, owning and operating an electric truck is already cheaper than owning and operating a gas-powered truck, and the difference is growing.

The problem is that many of the models that businesses require aren't scaleable, and some aren't even available.
The ACT rule aims to kickstart electric truck manufacturing by increasing production and sales volume, lowering prices, and making electric vehicles more affordable to make and buy. The more states adopt this strategy, the more likely it is to succeed. Currently, one out of five semi-trucks sold in the United States should comply with the ACT requirement, a statistic that will only increase as additional states embrace the law.

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